BIOECONOMIC SOCIETY

4. Achieve a circular bioeconomic society

Through effective networks of innovation and knowledge centres, connecting industrial actors, investors and
municipalities across boundaries of geography and competence, with informed and participating citizens.

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IN 2050

An innovation infrastructure with interlinked R&D centres stimulates
open innovation and facilitates exchange of expertise across Europe:

Providing open access to piloting facilities, technical and commercial testing platforms to accelerate commercialisation.

Ensuring low hurdles for SMEs to enter and participate.

Providing open access to piloting facilities, technical and commercial testing platforms to accelerate commercialisation

Ensuring low hurdles for SMEs to enter and participate.

Member States and regions support the bioeconomy by taking political action:

Deploying the benefits of the circular bioeconomy through infrastructures and legislative frameworks and promoting the use of local feedstock in bio-based value chains.

Implementing the EU’s Bioeconomy Strategy across all major, relevant EU policy initiatives including, among others, the Common Agricultural Policy, the Common Fisheries Policy, the Food Strategy, the Water Framework Directive as well as climate and environment strategies.

Utilising all fractions of renewable feedstock from multiple sources such as the land, sea, air (including CO2) and municipal bio-waste streams in a sustainable manner, through smart and efficient use of feedstock with zero-waste objectives.

Producing safe, nutritious and diverse food and feed for humans and animals, and achieving a sustainable consumption of animal and plant-based proteins; contributing to UN SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-being).

The primary sectors, operational actors, R&I institutions and market actors cooperate
with education institutions to meet mutual needs for skills and competences:

Constantly exchanging needs for skills and competences for the bioeconomy across Europe at vocational, applied
and fundamental research at university and PhD levels; to align education needs between all actors, society and academia.

Standardising bioeconomic curricula and diplomas across Europe.

Recognising input from all actors in terms of practical and ‘real time’ examples into curricula, educational programmes and materials.

Encouraging national and European innovation contests to stimulate exemplary performance by students and start-ups.

Institutionalising lifelong learning facilities and trainings that are shared by industry, government and society.

Constantly exchanging needs for skills and competences for the bioeconomy across Europe at vocational, applied
and fundamental research at university and PhD levels; to align education needs between all actors, society and academia.

Standardising bioeconomic curricula and diplomas across Europe.

Recognising input from all actors in terms of practical and ‘real time’ examples into curricula, educational programmes and materials.

Encouraging national and European innovation contests to stimulate exemplary performance by students and start-ups.

Institutionalising lifelong learning facilities and trainings that are shared by industry, government and society.

Active citizens consume and put forward proposals for novel bio-based products and services:

Participating in new business models and relationships for design, production, marketing and use of biobased products and services (quadruple helix).

Achieving societal acceptance and market uptake of innovative circular bioeconomy applications through strategic value chain partnerships.

Through purchasing and consumption patterns that are different from traditional 20th century linear ones.

  • Purchasing competitive bio-based products that meet all safety and product standards.
  • Consuming safe, nutritious, diverse and appealing food that has a minimal environmental footprint.

Participating in new business models and relationships for design, production, marketing and use of biobased products and services (quadruple helix).

Achieving societal acceptance and market uptake of innovative circular bioeconomy applications through strategic value chain partnerships.

Through purchasing and consumption patterns that are different from traditional 20th century linear ones.

  • Purchasing competitive bio-based products that meet all safety and product standards.
  • Consuming safe, nutritious, diverse and appealing food that has a minimal environmental footprint.